Police pull over driver clocked at 210 km/h on Highway 401

A 22-year-old man faces multiple charges after a vehicle was clocked going more than twice the speed limit on Highway 401 northeast of Chatham, provincial police say.

Officers pulled over an eastbound vehicle going 210 km/h near Duart Road about 11:30 p.m. Friday, Chatham-Kent OPP said Monday. Police seized 10 grams of marijuana from the vehicle, OPP said.

An Etobicoke, Ont., man, 22, is charged with drug possession, racing and driving without a licence. Driving 50 km/h or more over the posted speed limit, an offence under the Highway Traffic Act, carries an automatic seven-day licence suspension and vehicle impoundment. A conviction carries a fine between $2,000 and $10,000, six demerit points, up to six months in jail and a licence suspension of up to two years.

Sudbury’s city police recently told CBC News the majority of people don’t even realize they’re massively exceeding the speed limit — or what is in store once they’ve been caught.

John Coluzzi, a Sudbury police traffic unit constable, listed five things people may not know about stunt driving in Ontario.

1. If you get charged with stunt driving, your licence is automatically taken away.

Coluzzi said people are always surprised when police pull them over and take away their licence on the spot. Your driver’s licence is suspended for 7 days, and you’ll have to go to the Ministry of Transportation and pay a $180 fee to get it back.

2. Your car gets impounded for seven days — even if it’s your mom’s car.

Coluzzi said police impound the car no matter who it belongs to. In the past, that’s included rental cars, company cars, and your parent’s car. Whoever the car belongs to will be on the hook to pay the fee for towing, along with the fees for keeping the car at the impound lot for seven days.

“If it’s mom’s vehicle, and the son was driving it, the mom might say, ‘son you’re paying for that tow,'” Coluzzi said. “But if the mom wants her car back, she’s going to obviously [have to] pay it.”

3. Stunt driving involves more than just speeding — it also deals with actual stunts and road rage.

Driving on a bet, popping wheelies, and doing donuts (spinning in a circle without maintaining control) all count as stunt driving.

If you’ve got road rage, you’ll want to watch out too. Coluzzi said if you’re purposefully not letting someone pass, driving to close, or trying to make someone rear-end you, that’s stunt driving. If you turn left at an intersection and cut the traffic off going the opposite direction, that will count too.

4. Putting your friend in the trunk of your car counts as stunt driving too.

Short on seats? You might want to think twice before you get your extra friend to take a ride in your trunk. Coluzzi said he’s never personally seen it, but it has happened.

Another more unique charge: “Fail to occupy the driver’s seat of the vehicle.” Coluzzi said he isn’t too sure how this logistically could happen, but it would involve driving the motor vehicle while the driver isn’t sitting in the driver’s the seat. “Somebody else is controlling the wheel, and you’re not in control of the gas or breaking,” he said. “It would be an odd situation.”

5. The fine for stunt driving is double the fine for drunk driving.

If convicted, the minimum first-time fine for stunt driving is $2,000. That fine can go all the way up to $10,000. You could also end up with six months in jail and a 2 year licence suspension. In comparison, the first-time fine for drunk driving comes with a $1,000 charge.

What is considered to be Stunt Driving in Ontario?

Actions that may be considered to be Stunt Driving in Ontario include:

Driving at a rate of speed that is higher than 50km/hr;
Driving without care and attention to the road or without reasonable care for the safety of others on the road;
Driving without care and attention to the road or without reasonable care for the safety of others on the road;
Preventing another car from passing without reason;
Stopping or slowing your car in a manner that interferes with the movement of the cars behind you;
Completing Donuts (circular motions with your car);
Driving your car in a position that is not seated in the driver’s seat;
Driving with passengers in your trunk;
Improper turns.

The legal definition of Race, Contest and Stunt Driving
Definition, “race” and “contest”
2. (1) For the purposes of section 172 of the Act, “race” and “contest” include any activity where one or more persons engage in any of the following driving behaviours:
1. Driving two or more motor vehicles at a rate of speed that is a marked departure from the lawful rate of speed and in a manner that indicates the drivers of the motor vehicles are engaged in a competition.
2. Driving a motor vehicle in a manner that indicates an intention to chase another motor vehicle.
3. Driving a motor vehicle without due care and attention, without reasonable consideration for other persons using the highway or in a manner that may endanger any person by,
i. driving a motor vehicle at a rate of speed that is a marked departure from the lawful rate of speed,
ii. outdistancing or attempting to outdistance one or more other motor vehicles while driving at a rate of speed that is a marked departure from the lawful rate of speed, or
iii. repeatedly changing lanes in close proximity to other vehicles so as to advance through the ordinary flow of traffic while driving at a rate of speed that is a marked departure from the lawful rate of speed. O. Reg. 455/07, s. 2 (1).
(2) In this section,
“marked departure from the lawful rate of speed” means a rate of speed that may limit the ability of a driver of a motor vehicle to prudently adjust to changing circumstances on the highway. O. Reg. 455/07, s. 2 (2).
Definition, “stunt”
3. For the purposes of section 172 of the Act, “stunt” includes any activity where one or more persons engage in any of the following driving behaviours:
1. Driving a motor vehicle in a manner that indicates an intention to lift some or all of its tires from the surface of the highway, including driving a motorcycle with only one wheel in contact with the ground, but not including the use of lift axles on commercial motor vehicles.
2. Driving a motor vehicle in a manner that indicates an intention to cause some or all of its tires to lose traction with the surface of the highway while turning.
3. Driving a motor vehicle in a manner that indicates an intention to spin it or cause it to circle, without maintaining control over it.
4. Driving two or more motor vehicles side by side or in proximity to each other, where one of the motor vehicles occupies a lane of traffic or other portion of the highway intended for use by oncoming traffic for a period of time that is longer than is reasonably required to pass another motor vehicle.
5. Driving a motor vehicle with a person in the trunk of the motor vehicle.
6. Driving a motor vehicle while the driver is not sitting in the driver’s seat.
7. Driving a motor vehicle at a rate of speed that is 50 kilometres per hour or more over the speed limit.
8. Driving a motor vehicle without due care and attention, without reasonable consideration for other persons using the highway or in a manner that may endanger any person by,
i. driving a motor vehicle in a manner that indicates an intention to prevent another vehicle from passing,
ii. stopping or slowing down a motor vehicle in a manner that indicates the driver’s sole intention in stopping or slowing down is to interfere with the movement of another vehicle by cutting off its passage on the highway or to cause another vehicle to stop or slow down in circumstances where the other vehicle would not ordinarily do so,
iii. driving a motor vehicle in a manner that indicates an intention to drive, without justification, as close as possible to another vehicle, pedestrian or fixed object on or near the highway, or
iv. making a left turn where,
(A) the driver is stopped at an intersection controlled by a traffic control signal system in response to a circular red indication;
(B) at least one vehicle facing the opposite direction is similarly stopped in response to a circular red indication; and
(C) the driver executes the left turn immediately before or after the system shows only a circular green indication in both directions and in a manner that indicates an intention to complete or attempt to complete the left turn before the vehicle facing the opposite direction is able to proceed straight through the intersection in response to the circular green indication facing that vehicle. O. Reg. 455/07, s. 3.
Exceptions
4. (1) Despite section 2, “race” and “contest” do not include,
(a) a rally, navigational rally or similar event that is conducted,
(i) under the supervision of the Canadian Association of Rally Sport,
(ii) under the supervision of a club or association approved in writing by the Ministry, or
(iii) with the written approval of the road authority or road authorities having jurisdiction over the highway or highways used;
(b) motor vehicle owners engaged in a tour, scenic drive, treasure hunt or other similar motoring event in which the participants drive responsibly and in a manner that indicates an overall intention to comply with the provisions of the Act; or
(c) an event held on a closed course with the written approval of the road authority having jurisdiction over the highway, including any event lawfully using any of the trademarks “CART”, “Formula One”, “Indy”, “IndyCar”, “IRL” or “NASCAR”. O. Reg. 455/07, s. 4 (1).
(2) Despite sections 2 and 3, “race”, “contest” and “stunt” do not include any activity required for the lawful operation of motor vehicles described in subsections 62 (15.1) or 128 (13) of the Act, or the lawful operation of an emergency vehicle as defined in subsection 144 (1) of the Act. O. Reg. 455/07, s. 4 (2).

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2017-11-28T13:31:19+00:00 News, Traffic Tickets|